Infertility—Another Potential Health Risk of GM Foods

Posted: October 9, 2011 in Children and Child Rights, Education, Geopolitics, Politics, Uncategorized, Youths and Nation

There’s plenty of evidence suggesting that GM foods may pose a threat to future generations in more ways than one. Aside from birth defects, reproductive failure is another recurring theme in independent research.

For example:

  • A 2009 Brazilian study found that female rats fed GM soy for 15 months showed significant changes in their uterus and reproductive cycle, compared to rats fed organic soy or those raised without soy. The glyphosate in the soybeans is believed to be the cause of the problem as it throws off the delicate hormonal balance that governs the whole reproductive cycle.
  • In a 2009 French study , scientists discovered that glyphosate can kill the cells in the outer layer of the human placenta (the trophoblast membrane), which in turn can kill the placenta. Only 1/500th the amount needed to kill weeds was able to kill the cells. The amount is so small, according to the study authors, the “residual levels to be expected, especially in food and feed derived from R[oundup] formulation-treated crops” could be enough to “cause cell damage and even [cell] death.”
  • A Canadian epidemiological study, which looked at nearly 4,000 pregnancies in 1,898 couples, women exposed to glyphosate during the three months before getting pregnant had a significantly higher risk of miscarriages, especially for those above 34 years of age. Fathers who were exposed to glyphosate before their wives got pregnant showed an increase in early delivery and spontaneous abortions.
  • A study on male rabbits showed that glyphosate can cause a reduction in sexual activity and sperm concentration, and an increase in dead or abnormal sperm.
  • In 2005, Irina Ermakova with the Russian National Academy of Sciences reported that more than half the babies from mother rats fed GM soy died within three weeks. This was also five times higher than the 10 percent death rate of the non-GMO soy group. The babies in the GM group were also smaller and could not reproduce. When Ermakova fed male rats GM soy, their testicles changed from the normal pink to dark blue.
  • Italian scientists similarly found changes in mice testes (PDF), including damaged young sperm cells. Furthermore, the DNA of embryos from parent mice fed GM soy functioned differently.
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